Tag Archives: outreach

China: Headed for Endarkenment?

During summer 2016, some pretty alarming reports began circulating around the English-speaking world concerning commercial harvesting of Chinese fireflies from wild populations (see earlier post). In December, an international group of firefly experts called Fireflyers International Network (FIN) wrote a letter to the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection denouncing this practice. In March 2017, after receiving a very thoughtful response from the Chinese government, I’ll admit I felt pretty encouraged.

A villager collects fireflies attracted to his motorcycle headlight (Jiangxi Province, 2016).

But, sadly, the future remains grim for Chinese fireflies.

According to this article by reporter Zeng Jinqiu for Beijing News, villagers in rural areas can still make a pretty penny harvesting adult fireflies. Unfortunately, these adults only live for about one week,  and once removed from their native habitat,  they’re unable to successfully reproduce.

Who is buying live Chinese fireflies? It looks like the biggest consumers are  giant new indoor amusement parks that have popped up in various cities, and which put on live firefly shows for paying customers.

Commercial firefly exhibitions in 2016

During 2016, over fifty commercial venues purchased live fireflies (wild-caught) for their exhibitions (map prepared by firefly conservation group, 萤火虫生态线)

We have arranged a meeting with the fireflies… After a long disappearance, fireflies suddenly appeared … thousands of fireflies flying, shining in the dark, as bright as the stars,”  announced a recent advertisement for MAG Universal Magic World, one  amusement park located in the city of Guangzhou, Guangdong Province.

During April 2017 this park hosted ten live firefly exhibitions. At each event, they displayed a few thousand fireflies, which were housed in glass bottles, shaken periodically to encourage flashing. Because each night many fireflies died, they were replaced with fresh ones.

In a single year, with similar large-scale exhibitions of live fireflies happening all over China (see map), the lights of several hundred thousand fireflies were permanently extinguished.

MAG fireflies in jar

Staffer at MAG Universal Magic World in Guangzhou shakes captive fireflies to elicit flashing

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Taking in the fireflies @ Liyu Lake

Yesterday we took a firefly tour with our friends from Taroko National Park, Sophia & Soo and their two daughters. We drove south through the East Rift Valley, stopped off for dinner, and then headed to Liyu Lake in Hualien County.

Just past the entrance, the warm glow coming from a tent hung with red paper lanterns and brimming with people enticed us inside. There, enthusiastic volunteers talked to small groups of people – these were mostly adults along with a few kids. Using the colorful banners strung along the walls, each volunteer gave a short, informative talk describing the firefly life cycle, ecology and behavior.

Later, we followed Jackie, our volunteer guide, out into the night to enjoy the romantic flashdance of black-assed fireflies (Ascondita cerata), Taiwan’s most widely distributed species.

Jackie told us that 200+ people visit Liyu Lake every night during the summer-long firefly season. Each spring she attends a 2-day training session in order to be a firefly guide. The government funds the training program, along with all the interpretive materials. As Jackie explained to us, the government thinks this investment is worthwhile because it “shows the community the value of preserving fireflies.” So inspiring!

But it left me wondering – what would it take to set up a similar education program at firefly tourist sites in the United States?