Tag Archives: education

Meet Indiana’s new state insect!

On March 23rd Indiana became the fourth U.S. state to name a firefly species as their official state insect: Pyractomena angulata. Also called Say’s firefly, this species has a special connection to the state because it was first described by Indiana entomologist Thomas Say.

says-firefly

Pyractomena angulata (drawing by Arwin Provonsha) was discovered by Thomas Say in 1824

The official designation of Say’s firefly as Indiana’s first-ever state insect represents a heart-warming win, not just for fireflies, but also for the former 2nd-grade students at Cumberland Elementary School in West Lafayette. Beginning in 2014, they started  lobbying for this action, mounting a letter-writing campaign and even a Facebook page. Working together with teachers, scientists, and legislators, the students managed to gain bipartisan support and earlier this month watched as the bill was signed by Governor Eric Holcomb.

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The Firefly Flag (left), poem, and drawing by  students from the Cumberland Elementary School (image from Xerces Society blog).

With its glittering presence, Pyractomena angulata just might be my favorite firefly – always gives me a thrill to watch these high-flying males rise and fall as they emit their distinctive long-lasting (~ 1 second) orange flicker. It’s also one of North America’s most widespread fireflies, occurring east of the Mississippi from Florida all the way north into Canada.

This species becomes active after dark beginning sometime in May in the southern U.S.,  June and July in northern regions. So even if you don’t live in Indiana, keep your eyes peeled for them this summer!

 

 

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Announcing World Firefly Days: 7 & 8 July 2018

WFfday 2018

Fireflyers International Network (FIN) has just announced the first-ever World Firefly Day, an annual event to raise awareness about these tiny insects and spark interest in their conservation. Their goal is to get firefly fans all over the globe to celebrate by participating in local firefly-watching festivals, education programs, art exhibits, night walks, and more. For more info, visit the FIN website here.

The Double-edged Sword of Firefly Ecotourism

I believe that firefly ecotourism is poised to take off all over the world within the next few years. It’s already quite a popular activity in many Asian countries. For centuries, traveling to the countryside to admire the slow, floating flashes of Genji fireflies has been a favorite summer past-time in Japan. Over the past several decades, the synchronous fireflies that stretch out along the mangrove rivers of Thailand and Malaysia have spawned a thriving ecotourist industry.

catching fireflies woodblock

In Taiwan, the government has recently been promoting firefly tourism, and now each year over 100,000 visitors climb up into the Alishan mountains to view the summer and winter fireflies that thrive there. In other places, firefly tourism remains in its infancy. As my earlier post describes, visitors to firefly ecotourist sites in Nanacamilpa, Mexico have skyrocketed since 2014. In the United States, places like Elkmont, Tennessee and North Carolina’s Dupont State Forest are becoming increasingly popular destinations for their firefly-viewing.

Photo by Radim Schreiber (Radim Photo)

Synchronous fireflies in the Great Smoky Mountains

Yet firefly ecotourism carries both opportunities and challenges. On the positive side, it offers tangible benefits to local communities by promoting sustainable economic development. It’s also a terrific opportunity to educate visitors concerning the behavior, ecology, and habitat requirements of these beloved insects.

On the other hand, ecotourism carries challenges. It brings hordes of people into natural areas that are often far too fragile. In the case of fireflies, artificial light must be minimized, as it can interfere with fireflies’ luminous courtship signals. Some firefly species have flightless females, and these easily get trampled by people walking through their habitat. To minimize harm to natural firefly populations, thoughtful habitat management needs to be combined with environmental education.

As humans, we have a long history of taking our natural resources completely for granted. All too often, we regretfully note their demise only after they have vanished. Great auks, giant sequoias, Alishan’s hinoki cedars, and Australia’s Great Barrier Reef are but a few of the treasures we’ve already lost.

Maybe it’s time to pause a moment. Let’s decide what parts of the natural world we truly value. What kind of world do we want to leave for our children and our grandchildren? Then let’s get busy protecting those places and those creatures before it’s too late.

Taking in the fireflies @ Liyu Lake

Yesterday we took a firefly tour with our friends from Taroko National Park, Sophia & Soo and their two daughters. We drove south through the East Rift Valley, stopped off for dinner, and then headed to Liyu Lake in Hualien County.

Just past the entrance, the warm glow coming from a tent hung with red paper lanterns and brimming with people enticed us inside. There, enthusiastic volunteers talked to small groups of people – these were mostly adults along with a few kids. Using the colorful banners strung along the walls, each volunteer gave a short, informative talk describing the firefly life cycle, ecology and behavior.

Later, we followed Jackie, our volunteer guide, out into the night to enjoy the romantic flashdance of black-assed fireflies (Ascondita cerata), Taiwan’s most widely distributed species.

Jackie told us that 200+ people visit Liyu Lake every night during the summer-long firefly season. Each spring she attends a 2-day training session in order to be a firefly guide. The government funds the training program, along with all the interpretive materials. As Jackie explained to us, the government thinks this investment is worthwhile because it “shows the community the value of preserving fireflies.” So inspiring!

But it left me wondering – what would it take to set up a similar education program at firefly tourist sites in the United States?